Accessibility View Close toolbar

87 W Main Street

Dryden, NY 13053 US

607-844-3304

Open mobile navigation

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a non-drug, non-invasive therapy that may produce a variety of benefits-from pain management to helping with nausea associated with
chemotherapy. According to the 2002 National Health Interview Survey, an estimated 8.2 million Americans have been to an acupuncturist, and an estimated 2.1 million U.S. adults used acupuncture in the previous year. Since the use of acupuncture has spread widely in the U.S. in the past 20 years, researchers are studying the benefits of acupuncture for many conditions, including
low-back pain, headaches, and osteoarthritis of the knee.

Acupuncture may be useful as an independent treatment for some conditions, but it can also be used as a complement to other healthcare therapies.

The philosophy of acupuncture
One of the oldest healing arts, acupuncture originated in China and other Asian countries thousands of years ago. Acupuncture practitioners believe that all illness is caused from interference with the flow of energy, also called chi, and imbalance of two opposing and complementary forces within the body: yin, the cold and passive aspect, and yang, the hot, active, and excited aspect.

To restore the balance between yin and yang and to unblock chi, acupuncture stimulates specific points of the body through several techniques, including insertion of hair-thin metal needles through the skin. In Chinese medicine, chi is believed to flow through pathways (meridians) in the body, which are accessible through more than 350 acupuncture points. Western medicine explains the effect of acupuncture through stimulating nerves, muscles, and connective tissue, which increases the body's natural activity to regulate pain and increase blood flow.

Before your visit
• Ask your doctor of chiropractic or another health care provider for a referral. Some doctors of chiropractic practice acupuncture, too.
• Ask people you trust for recommendations.
• Check online referral listings of national acupuncture organizations.
• Check the acupuncturist's credentials. A license is required to practice acupuncture; however, education and training standards, as well as license-obtaining requirements, vary among states. Most states require non-physician acupuncturists to pass an exam through the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.
• Interview the provider. Ask what the treatment involves, how likely it is to be effective for your condition, and how much it will cost.
• Check with your insurance company to find out if the treatment is covered by your insurance.

During your visit
During your first office visit, the acupuncture practitioner may ask you for details related to your health condition, lifestyle, and behavior. Be sure to tell the provider about all treatments or medications you are taking and all conditions you have. Ask how many visits the treatment will take approximately.

While acupuncture providers may have different styles, a typical visit-which usually lasts about 30 minutes- includes an exam and assessment of your condition, insertion of needles, and advice on home care. Before the needles are placed, you will lie down on a comfortable surface face down, face up, or on your side, depending on where the needles will be inserted. Usually the procedure isn't painful; however, you may feel a brief, sharp sensation when the needle is inserted and when it reaches the correct depth. Sometimes, the needles are gently moved or stimulated with electricity or heat. Each treatment may require the insertion of as many as 12 needles, which stay in place for 5 to 20 minutes.

The effects of acupuncture
In addition to controlling pain, acupuncture may be used for:
• Stroke rehabilitation
• Headaches, especially migraines
• Menstrual cramps
• Tennis elbow
• Fibromyalgia
• Myofascial pain
• Osteoarthritis
• Low-back pain
• Carpal tunnel syndrome
• Asthma
• Dental pain
• Labor pain

Benefits and risks
Just as with other therapies, acupuncture has benefits and risks. On the benefit side, acupuncture:
• Has few side effects
• Can be a useful complement to other therapies
• Is becoming widely available
• Helps control certain types of pain

If you have a bleeding disorder or are taking blood thinners, acupuncture may not be for you.

Acupuncture treatment is experienced differently by different people-some report feeling energized by treatment; others feel relaxed. Most report feeling no or minimal pain from the insertion of the needles. Soreness and pain during treatment can result from improper needle placement, a defect in the needle, or the movement of the patient. Some experience bleeding or bruising at the needle sites.

If acupuncture is not provided by a properly qualified practitioner, however, potentially serious side effects can occur. Acupuncture needles, which are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, should be sterile and non-toxic, and should come in single-use packages labeled for use by qualified providers only. Some complications have been reported from inadequately
sterilized needles. Inappropriately delivered treatment can result in infections and injured organs. These risks, however, are low when acupuncture is provided by a competent, certified practitioner..

Sources:
http://nccam.nih.gov/health/acupuncture/
www.mayoclinic.com/health/acupuncture/SA00086
www.webmd.com/fibromyalgia/tc/acupuncture-topicoverview

We now offer hydrotherapy on our AquaThermassage III table.

Office Hours

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

Closed

Tuesday:

8:30 am-7:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:30 am-6:00 pm

Thursday:

8:30 am-7:00 pm

Friday:

8:30 am-6:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Find us on the map

Testimonial

  • "Amazing work performed at this office. Professional and talented. You walk in feeling welcome and walk out part of a great group. My body has been salvaged over and over! The absolute best chiropractors,"
    by Beth - 03/22/2011

Featured Articles

Read about interesting topics

  • Left-Handers Day

    Left-Handers Day Left-Handers Day, celebrated on August 15th, was launched in 1992 by the Left-Handers Club, an organization based in the United Kingdom. Since then, Left-Handers Day has become a worldwide event and social media phenomenon. Around the world, approximately one in ten persons is left-handed. ...

    Read More
  • Peak Experiences

    Peak Experiences The American philosopher and naturalist Henry David Thoreau roamed far and wide over the hills and mountains of his native Massachusetts and neighboring New Hampshire. In his masterwork, "Walden," Thoreau famously stated that we must "reawaken and keep ourselves awake, not by mechanical ...

    Read More
  • Dynamic Warm-ups

    In a common occurrence, you bend over to pick up the pencil you inadvertently dropped on the floor. Or you bend over to pick up the soap bar that has slipped through your fingers in the shower. Or you bend over to lift a bag of groceries out of your automobile trunk. These are all daily events. But on ...

    Read More
  • Summer Sports

    Summer Sports In the summertime, everyone's thoughts turn to the outdoors. We want to get out in the sun and have some fun. Some people do exercise outdoors, such as running, walking, and biking, all year long regardless of the weather.1 For others, summer's warmer temperatures make activity outside ...

    Read More
  • Wellness Gardens

    Wellness Gardens When time is spent in an office or indoors day in and day out, some can lose that connection to the outside world. And that loss of connection can lead to higher stress levels and more health ailments without even realizing it. But when that the gap between office life and outdoor life ...

    Read More
  • Smart Shoulders

    Our shoulder joints have the greatest range of motion of any of the musculoskeletal joints in our bodies. The shoulder joint is really two joints, the glenohumeral joint between the arm bone (humerus) and the shoulder blade (scapula) and the acromioclavicular joint between the acromion (a bony projection off the scapula) and the collarbone (clavicle). The glenohumeral joint is a ball-and-socket joint and the acromioclavicular joint is a gliding joint. ...

    Read More
  • A Book and Its Cover

    A book cover may not necessarily tell the whole story and may not accurately portray the nature of the contents within. Publishing companies pay high salaries to their marketing staff to create cover copy that will entice prospective buyers to make a purchase. But many times the book itself does not ...

    Read More
  • When Your Spine Is In Line

    Good spinal alignment means good biomechanical health. Essentially, your spine is the biomechanical center of your body. Your legs are connected to your spine via two large and strong pelvic bones. Your arms are connected to your spine via your shoulder blades, ribs, and numerous strong muscles and ligaments. ...

    Read More
  • An Apple a Day . . .

    What is so good about an apple? Is it the color, ranging from ruby red to pale pink? Is it the crunch? The sweetness? Or is it, instead, a combination of all of these qualities, plus the natural goodness derived from the apple's secret ingredients — phytonutrients? If this were a multiple choice quiz, the answer would be "all of the above". Importantly, in addition to possessing numerous appealing physical qualities, apples contain an abundance of health-promoting biochemicals known as phytonutrients.1,2 These specific organic molecules are derived not only from apples but many other fresh fruits and vegetables, and help power the immune system, protect against cancer, maintain healthy eyes, and assist cells in clearing out metabolic waste products such as free radicals. ...

    Read More
  • Standing Tall

    Young peoples' bones stop growing by approximately age 20, somewhat earlier in women and somewhat later in men. Long bone growth, that is, in the arm, forearm, thigh, and leg, ceases later and smaller bone growth, that is, in the hands, feet, and spine, ceases earlier. In essence, you're as tall as you're ...

    Read More

Newsletter Sign Up